Gender

Delusions of gender and technological ability

When I tell people about my PhD—that I research ways to make technology more engaging for women—I usually brace myself for a reply like this: “Why would you bother to do that? Everyone knows men are just better with technology. It’s science!”. It happens more often than you would think, and more often than I’d like. And then I get into a whole conversation about why this isn’t true. So I thought I’d lay out the arguments against biological determinism—the idea that ‘male’ and ‘female’ bodies are in some way built to have different competencies in doing maths, designing bridges or operating computers—so I can point people here instead. And then there turned out to be a lot of arguments to cover and this turned into a pretty long read.

Accessing the means of production

A key problem created by gender imbalances in the tech and engineering industries is that it means fewer women than men have access to the means of designing and producing technological artefacts. If most programmers and engineers are men, then most software and hardware is going to be designed by men.

Seriously, why do we still have different Academy Awards for male and female actors?

I hate gender-specific job titles with the power of a thousand suns. As well as perpetuating the idea that there are only two genders that everyone has to fit themselves into, it seems so derogatory to shove an ‘-ess’ on the end of a regular job title just because somebody who identifies as a woman is doing it.